fbpx
Client Login

Stay Updated

Subscribe to the INSURICA blog and receive the latest news direct to your inbox.

Subscribe to the blog

Eye Injuries Are a Serious Threat

There are countless eye hazards on a construction site, including particles that have been ejected from a tool or blown by the wind. Chemical splashes and swinging objects can also be eye hazards on a worksite. However, most eye injuries are preventable if you follow simple safety precautions and always wear your safety goggles.

Use Protective Eyewear

It’s a proven fact that the best thing you can do to protect your vision on the job is to wear safety glasses or goggles. Even if you do have your safety glasses on, keep in mind that there are a variety of ways you can get debris in your eyes. Some eye injuries happen by simply taking off your safety glasses and wiping your face—particles can easily fall out of eyebrows or hair and into your eyes.

Safety glasses should rest firmly on top of the nose and close to—but not against—the face. If they are uncomfortable, foggy or sight-restrictive, then find a different pair. Do not let excuses get in the way of protecting your eyes.

Find a Good Fit

You can find many ways to make safety glasses or goggles work for you, such as:

  • If you find safety glasses uncomfortable, experiment with different sizes or styles.
  • Make sure glasses fit well while you are also wearing your hard hat and other protective equipment.
  • Wear glasses or goggles that are properly ventilated for the work you are performing. Unless you are working near splash hazards, use goggles that have plenty of side ventilation.
  • If you wear prescription glasses, wear goggles designed to fit over your glasses or safety glasses made with your prescription.
  • If your goggles fog up, try a model with more ventilation or coat them with an anti-fog liquid.
  • Wear a sweatband or handkerchief around your head to keep sweat off your goggles.
  • Always keep your safety glasses clean. Scratched and dirty glasses or goggles can reduce vision, cause glare and may contribute to accidents.

Safety First

It takes only one eye injury to cause partial or complete blindness. Even tasks that you don’t consider dangerous may present a risk for eye injury. Take a moment to think about possible eye hazards around each job site, and then take the necessary precautions to help prevent potential accidents and injuries.

For more jobsite safety tips contact INSURICA today.

This is not intended to be exhaustive nor should any discussion or opinions be construed as legal advice. Readers should contact legal counsel or an insurance professional for appropriate advice. © 2022 Zywave, Inc. All rights reserved.

About the Author

INSURICA
INSURICA

Share This Story

Keep up to date

Subscribe to the INSURICA blog and receive the latest news direct to your inbox.

Subscribe to the blog

Related Blogs

Q4 2022 Essentials for Plan Sponsors

December 1st, 2022|Blog, Employee Benefits|

The RxDC reporting requirement requires employers to submit prescription drug data to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the Department of Treasury, and the Department of Labor (DOL). The deadline is December 27, 2022. Some of the required information includes:

Five Critical Issues for Employers Reporting 2023 ACA Compliance

November 29th, 2022|Blog, Employee Benefits|

According to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), applicable large employers (ALEs) are obligated to offer full-time employees and dependents affordable minimum essential health coverage. They must also report to the IRS information about the health coverage plans they offer.

Go to Top